The World's Healthiest Foods

The Latest News about Turkey

Multiple studies have pointed to key differences in the health risk associated with high intake of red meats like beef versus high intake of white meats like turkey. In the case of red meats, high intake has been associated with increased risk of heart disease, increased risk of type 2 diabetes, and increased risk of colon cancer. High intake of white meats - including turkey - has not been associated with these health problems in a majority of studies.

What's New and Beneficial About Turkey

WHFoods Recommendations

One of the great advantages of turkey is that much of the fat can be easily removed making it a very lean source of protein. We recommend roasting turkey to keep it moist and bring out is best flavor. Turkey dries out quickly so it is important not to overcook it; it is also important not to undercook it. For more on the Healthiest Way of Cooking Turkey see the How to Enjoy section of the turkey write-up on the website. While usually associated with the holidays, turkey can be enjoyed year round.

Health Benefits

Turkey provides numerous health benefits including:

For more details on turkey's health benefits, see this section of our turkey write-up.

Nutritional Profile

Turkey is a very good source of protein, providing 65% of the DV in a four-ounce portion. Along with protein, turkey is a very good source of immune-supportive selenium. In addition, it is a good source of energy-enhancing niacin, vitamin B6, and phosphorus. Turkey can also be a source of other important nutrients, depending on the diet that was consumed by the animals. For example, it is possible for turkey to contain valuable amounts of omega-3 fatty acids if omega-3 containing fats were regularly included in the animals' diet and the animal was in good health during its life.

For more on this nutrient-rich food, including references related to this Latest News, see our write-up on turkey.